“Ain’t Nothing Like Being Free”

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This Sunday, September 4th at 8:30pm

station923 presents an outdoor screening:

“Ain’t Nothing Like Being Free” is the second documentary film by John Meyer: a uniquely juxtaposed showcase of dreamers, adventurers, and madmen set in the swampy environs of central Florida. Time is spent with a priest who claims to have visited heaven three times, an amateur psychic archaeologist in search of Ponce De Leon’s cabin, a group of rappers from Orlando, and a self-proclaimed redneck turned actor.

trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAVwx-FHXBw

https://www.facebook.com/aintnothinglikebeingfree/<https://www.facebook.com/aintnothinglikebeingfree/…>

Oracle Plus: Psychic sisters Miel and Steph Lister experiment with moving and touchable images. Drawing dreams behind your eyelids, Oracle Plus penetrates the psyche with synchronized psychedelic pseudo-science performance. From Oakland, CA via Florida.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gu2l04EdNAw&feature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-0EwzIi11s&feature=youtu.be

Dungeon Bronco Vidz 2016. A paradisiacal Wreckage. Collaged re-working of Video Artist Jenny Bronco’s last 4 years of lo-fi home video, processed, and re-processed. Doors slam, people pee, tapes burn, and sometimes you hear a Grateful Dead song….

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mhOkEvo2Ec&feature=youtu.be

The Trailer for the upcoming film “Ain’t Nothing Like Being Free”

August 26: Ahmed Ozsever

 

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Ahmed Ozsever

Arche/Structure

8.26.16

reception: 6-9pm

Ahmed Ozsever’s work explores perceptions of time through the embedded memory traces that manifest in both constructed and natural environments. Ahmed works in installation utilizing various materials and techniques including video, sound, and text; all of which are informed by photographic way of looking and thinking.

The forthcoming exhibition Arche/Structure looks at infrastructure as the bridge between highly regimented quotidian time and seemingly unquantifiable geological time. The subject matter is inspired by Station 923’s proximity to the now defunct Ithaca-Geneva rail line, originally constructed to supersede the canal structure of New York State. The resulting works are immersive and experiential; eliciting sensations of compressed distance while establishing relationships between the domestic space and landscape through forced and obscure vantage points. The exhibition will feature sculptural, photographic, and sound components; installed to seamlessly transition from one to the next, while engaging the unique architecture of the space.

Ahmed currently lives and works in Chicago, IL. Arche/Structure continues in the lineage of his recent exhibition Tracing the Inevitable Axis/Point (2015). Ahmed earned his MFA from Cornell University in 2015 and is excited to be returning to Ithaca for this upcoming exhibition.

On view through September 2nd


Closing Reception and Film Screening

Stephanie Clark

Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor

Closing Reception and Film Screening: Friday, June 24, 2016 / 8PM-LATE
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Films

“The Point of Least Resistance” – Peter Fischli and David Weiss
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GeRlFbWzzFU

“The Way Things Go” – Peter Fischli and David Weiss
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XniQwRFLTqc

Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor represents a series of new work by Stephanie Clark that considers the wood pallet as support, frame, and material. While walking past construction sites Clark realized that the forms of the pallets were aesthetically transformative and interrupted the ways in which she navigates and perceives her physical environment.

At once referencing painterly concerns and what it means for an object to shift into one realm from another, Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor makes manifest the transitions that we all make when existing within the constructs of modernity or post-modernity.

What does it mean when we relate to objects that are deemed unnecessary and what does it mean to repurpose and use them once again to build a new field or spatial relationship? How do marks and gestures represent a history, a genealogy and a physical remembrance of time passed and events impacted?

STEPHANIE CLARK (b. 1988, White Sands Desert, NM) is an MFA Visual Arts Candidate at Cornell University. Her work has been featured on the arts and culture blog, Booooooom!, Vancouver, BC, Canada; in Paradigm Magazine, Philadelphia, PA; on the cover of the Chicago Review, Issue 59:1/2, Chicago, IL; in Bat City Review, Issue 11, Austin, TX; and in Studio Visit Magazine, Issue 30, Boston, MA. Clark has exhibited both nationally and internationally. This is her first solo show with station923.


5.6.16: New season opens with Stephanie Clark

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Stephanie Clark

Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor

Opening: Friday, May 6, 2016 / 6PM-9PM

Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor represents a series of new work by Stephanie Clark that considers the wood pallet as support, frame, and material. While walking past construction sites Clark realized that the forms of the pallets were aesthetically transformative and interrupted the ways in which she navigates and perceives her physical environment.

At once referencing painterly concerns and what it means for an object to shift into one realm from another, Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor makes manifest the transitions that we all make when existing within the constructs of modernity or post-modernity.

What does it mean when we relate to objects that are deemed unnecessary and what does it mean to repurpose and use them once again to build a new field or spatial relationship? How do marks and gestures represent a history, a genealogy and a physical remembrance of time passed and events impacted?

STEPHANIE CLARK (b. 1988, White Sands Desert, NM) is an MFA Visual Arts Candidate at Cornell University. Her work has been featured on the arts and culture blog, Booooooom!, Vancouver, BC, Canada; in Paradigm Magazine, Philadelphia, PA; on the cover of the Chicago Review, Issue 59:1/2, Chicago, IL; in Bat City Review, Issue 11, Austin, TX; and in Studio Visit Magazine, Issue 30, Boston, MA. Clark has exhibited both nationally and internationally. This is her first solo show with station923.

http://stephaniemclark.squarespace.com/


9.4.15 A pirate’s guide to survival

Dara Engler 
A pirate’s guide to survival 
9.4.15
6-9pm

Spearfishing for Sea Lamprey
How to Skin a Squirrel

Engler’s paintings are portraits of an alter ego, often rooted in exaggerations of her own experiences. Their loose narratives are allegorical, embracing human foible and the humor that comes with it. Her interest in the figure lies in these awkward obstacles to which we can all relate. Inspired by her time in Louisiana and Ithaca and by Karen Russell’s book “St. Lucy’s Home For Girls Raised By Wolves,” this pirate has adopted the curiosity of Russell’s characters. She is skinning squirrels, spear fishing for sea lamprey, and learning to build wattle and daub shelter. She is an explorer, running into new creatures in new lands.

As an artist, Engler has always enjoyed constructing environments for her character before painting. They function as stage sets that are translated into two-dimensions again before they reach the audience. The things she previously considered to be props are now as much a part of the artwork as the paintings themselves and they should be shown together. In her paintings it is often unclear whether the figure is outside or whether the background is a backdrop in an imagined space. Her work plays with flatness, pattern and line juxtaposed with the rendered form. The paintings teeter between real and imagined worlds. The inclusion of the three-dimensional objects further clouds the line between fact and fiction.

images from top:

Spearfishing for Sea Lamprey, 2014, oil on canvas, 36in. x 60in

How to Skin a Squirrel, 2014, oil on canvas, 33in. x 40in

***

Outdoor screening at dark: 

presented by the Ithaca International Fantastic Film Festival

(weather permitting)

Love Eternal– Brendan Muldowney; 2013/ Ireland

LoveEternFeat-2For Ian Harding, death is natural- he’s been confronted to it his whole life, and as anyone would do, he’s trying to make sense of it. The isolated young man is beginning a quest: chasing the meaning of his life – And the only way to get there is to get as close to death as possible.

Based on Kei Oishi’s acclaimed novel In Love With The Dead, Brendan Muldowney’s film is an emotional tour de force. Despite the dark areas of the human mind explored form the first second of the first reel- the fascination of death transcends the film, and Muldowney’s achieves a level of pure and simple beauty that any filmmakers and cinematographers would only dream of. A one of a kind film, for a one of a kind story, it’s the art of cinema at it’s finest.

Watch the Trailer here

 


9.19.14: Outlet: Part I

9.19.14

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Outlet: Part I

Rotem Rozental and Roy Regev

opening reception:

Friday, September 19th from 6 to 9pm

On view through October 8th

By 1985, Israel had only three shopping malls: Clal Center in Jerusalem, London Ministore in Tel Aviv and Ayalon Canyon at the adjacent city of Ramat Gan. Much of the commercial engagements in neighborhoods in Israel’s periphery and suburbs took place in shopping plazas known as Merkaz Mishari, literally translated as Trade Centers.

2014-08-22 07.38.34-2Whereas the shopping malls signified particular perceptions of consumerism and consumerist culture, as these emerged in Hausman’s 19th century Paris and were later re-articulated in North America, the local trade centers were abundant in local mom-and-pop’s stores, catering for the specific needs of the local community. As oppose to the chain stores that housed the air conditioned windowless hallways of the shopping malls, located outside of the city center, the trade centers were significantly situated in the heart of the neighborhood and as such, their daily routine had to comply with the beating pulse of their varied locations. Intimate communal experiences and activities were negotiated in the plaza of the trade center, between the vegetable stores, the libraries and the local coffee shops.

In Israel’s smaller towns, the trade center is currently struggling to maintain its public appeal. Faced with changing economies, demographics, modes of communication and participation in the public domain, the hardships of the trade center seems to echo the distress of urban environments to maintain their individual identities. Outlet will therefore identify their emergence all across Israel in particular times, their common characteristics, inherent differences, as well as their functions within different communities. These observations, obtained by various media, are stored in a private archive, operating by its own systemic logic, which will be open to the public in the gallery. The trade center will be brought in to Station923, a location which in itself is shaped in constant transition between the private and the public, between the private home and the conductor’s storage space, between the cottage and the exhibition space.

 

Special thanks to the Israel Architecture Archive

IAA Info 2


July show at station923

station923 presents:

Besides

Clara Chapin

Opening reception Friday, July 25th

6 to 9pm

On view by appt from July 25 – September 3, 2014

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Sets of objects, images, and phrases, placed beside one another elaborate miniature dramas. They function as parataxis a literary tool which juxtaposes simple sentences or statements (without any hierarchy  or conjunction) to create meaning in a physical context.  [Greek, a placing side by side, from paratassein, to arrange side by side : para-, beside; see para-1 + tassein, tag-, to arrange.]The vocabulary of elements presented in these sets are culled from the last two years and touch upon the weather, inter-subjectivity, desire, tragedy, feminism and chromology.  Through the ordering of these fragments, and gestures, narratives can be derived. The stories are further informed by the fact of them being displayed in a domestic environment.  Station 923, in addition to being a space for art exhibition since 2011, is a home and frequently hosts friends, as well as airbnb guests.  These are just things to live with.

 Whatever may be either retained or omitted, without making any sensible difference, is not properly a part.

 -Aristotle

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Screening at dusk by the

Ithaca Fantastic Film Festival:

JSA, Park Chan-Wook; 2000

JSA-vertSummer mini series at Station923: Revisiting political thrillers

Station 923 and The Ithaca Int’l Fantastic Film Festival are putting together a three film mini-series to re-explore the political thriller genre with selections spanning the 30 years before the new millennium from across three territories. From Park Chan-Wook’s, South-Korean, film industry game-changer, JSA (Joint Security Area, 2000); to the vanguard experimental film, Michel Deville’s Le Dossier 51 (1976); to Alan Pakula’s second instalment in the paranoia trilogy, The Parallax View (1974), each of these films changed the way we see cinema.

JSA, Park Chan-Wook; 2000

When two North Korean soldiers are murdered in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) between North and South Korea, a Swiss-born officer is brought in to investigate. While looking into the murders, she interviews both North and South Korean officers and learns that the histories, and intrigue, run deeper than originally thought.